Our Services

Email Obituary Notifications

Our Location

Local Weather

Weather information is currently unavailable.


Thank you for taking the time to visit our website. A great deal of time and effort has gone into providing this service to our community and the families we serve. We are constantly enhancing the information in this medium and hope that you find it helpful and convenient. We are here to continue to provide the highest standards for our community and to the families that we serve.


2015-09-10 - Although death is one of the things that are certain in life, most if not all people still find it difficult to deal with it when placed in this situation. Grieving for the death of a loved one is a long process that takes time and acceptance. However, with the help and concern of other people, this process is made a little easier for the people who are in grief. People who attend funerals must be aware of the proper etiquette to be observed during this time and observe the do’s and don’ts. The most common and sincere way of extending your sympathy is to say “I am sorry” to the bereaved for their loss. These three words are enough to convey to the grieving person that you understand the importance of the deceased person in their life and that you share their sadness. These words are enough to show that you sincerely care for the bereaved. More than talking, listening is very important during funerals. Studies show that people who have suffered losses accept their situation quickly with the help of other people who are willing to listen and help them deal with their grief. During this period, the bereaved needs to express his sadness and anger together with the memories of the deceased person. The need to talk is an outlet of letting out all of their feelings about the situation. A person does a lot of help simply by listening. It is best not to push the bereaved to talk about his lost loved one rather this should be a spontaneous thing. You should refer to the deceased person by name, using no other terms. Memories are bound to come up during your conversation with the aggrieved, and no matter how repetitive it might become, just try to be patient in listening. Nonverbal actions are equally important during funerals. A gentle, sincere hug or a shoulder to cry on is what a bereaved person needs to feel to know that he is not alone in his grief. Death brings out the vulnerability of every person hence the simplest touch could be a source of strength for the grieving people. Grieving is normal as it forms part of our complex emotions as human beings. Grief is not something we can simply set aside. During funerals, it is suggested that you ask the bereaved if you can do anything to help them. Even if they do not have anything in mind, it helps a lot on the part of a grieving person to know that he is surrounded by friends that care for his welfare. Support in whatever form will be greatly appreciated by the bereaved and will weigh favorably on their acceptance of their situation. Death is hard to accept but can be made easier by the love extended by people who truly care.

2015-09-10 - Often times when it comes to kids, we aren't always sure how to help them grieve. We are fortunate in the Central Ohio area to have a number of wonderful resources. More information can be found by calling Ohio Health at 614-533-6065. Cornerstone of Hope offers programs not only for kids but adults as well. They can be reached at 614-824-4285 or www.cornerstoneofhope.org. They have programs starting at various times and on various subjects.

2013-05-06 - People grow a lot when they are faced with their own mortality. I have learned never to underestimate someone's capacity for growth. When questioned about any regrets they had or anything they would do differently, common themes surfaced among those who knew they were experiencing their last days. Here are the most common five: 1. I wish I'd had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me. This was the most common regret of all. When people realize that their life is almost over and look back clearly on it, it is easy to see how many dreams have gone unfulfilled. Health brings a freedom very few realize, until they no longer have it. 2. I wish I didn't work so hard. This came from every male patient I nursed. They missed their children's youth and their partner's companionship. Women also spoke of this regret. By creating more space in your life, you become happier and more open to new opportunities, ones more suited to your new lifestyle. 3. I wish I'd had the courage to express my feelings. Many people suppressed their feelings in order to keep peace with others. As a result, they settled for a mediocre existence and never became who they were truly capable of becoming. Many developed illnesses relating to the bitterness and resentment they carried as a result. 4. I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends. Often they would not truly realize the full benefits of old friends until their dying weeks, and it was not always possible to track them down. It is common for anyone in a busy lifestyle to let friendships slip. But when you are faced with your approaching death, the physical details of life fall away. People do want to get their financial affairs in order if possible. But it is not money or status that holds the true importance for them. They want to get things in order more for the benefit of those they love. Usually though, they are too ill and weary to ever manage this task. It all comes down to love and relationships in the end. 5. I wish that I had let myself be happier. This is a surprisingly common one. Many did not realize until the end that happiness is a choice. They had stayed stuck in old patterns and habits. Fear of change had them pretending to others, and to themselves, that they were content. When deep within, they longed to laugh properly and have silliness in their life again. Life is a choice. It is your life. Choose consciously, choose wisely and choose honestly. Choose happiness. Thanks to Bronnie Ware, from: AARP, February 1, 2012 for this great reminder. To read the entire article go to http://tinyurl.com/7rmm8sg

2011-02-07 - Have you checked your will lately? Have you had more children, marital status changed, changed jobs, or bought property? These are just a few of the reasons why you may want to update your will. If your estate plan does not account for such events, after your death, your estate may not be distributed as you would have wanted.